Gambling Addiction: Taking the Fantasy Out of Fantasy Football

Fantasy football players say that Draft Day is one of the most anticipated days of the year, according to a recent survey by SurveyMonkey and CBSSports.com. About 63% of the approximately 2,000 fantasy players surveyed described themselves as “big fans,” and 20% said Draft Day is the most anticipated day of their year–beating out Christmas and birthdays.

The fantasy football survey revealed other interesting statistics as well. Among people who play the game:

  • 29% spend at least an hour each week adjusting their lineups during work;
  • 65% check scores while in the bathroom;
  • 50% check scores over holiday dinners;
  • 36% check in on their teams during work meetings;
  • 33% play fantasy football to socialize with family and friends.

Fantasy football can trigger real-life consequences.

For many Americans, fantasy football is a fun way to enjoy a sport they love and connect with family and friends. For others, however, fantasy football can be a risky activity that contributes to problem gambling—a fact that may be surprising considering the game often takes place over a period of weeks and the primary payout usually comes to winners at season’s end.

In truth, any activity that stakes money on an outcome is gambling. It doesn’t matter if that money is staked on a poker game, lottery ticket, basketball tournament, or fantasy football league.

Last year, for example, The New York Times shared the story of a man with a gambling problem that spiraled out of control when he played fantasy football. The man eventually lost $20,000 on daily online fantasy sports games and additional tens of thousands on illegal sports bets.

Find gambling help in Lancaster, PA.

Are you worried that your fantasy football play is getting out of control? Are you concerned about a loved one’s betting behavior? Take the gambling risk quiz.

Let the Compass Mark team direct you to problem gambling treatment and prevention in Lancaster County, PA and Lebanon County, PA. For confidential, no-judgment guidance, call us at 717-299-2831 or fill out our Help Form.

 

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